Forum questions

Discussion in 'Discussion About The Forum' started by Stephen Batey, Aug 8, 2016.

  1. YorkshireBloke

    YorkshireBloke Member Registered User

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    Good point, we here are creating a valuable resource: chemicals will be available for ever, cameras for decades... Just film stock is my concern! :eek: This site can be proud to have really serious, even erudite, threads deeply explaining the craft and art of 5x4. A gift to the future.

    Yes, also I agree the digital world is "eating its children" right now. Can it ever stabilise? Will there be classic digital equipment, revered in decades to come?

    My take is no. Our "sensors" are renewable, even disposable (film), digital sensors drag down the mirror boxes , shutters, lens mounts, CPUs etc that surround them.

    What do you think? :rolleyes:
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2018
  2. Stephen Batey

    Stephen Batey Well-Known Member Registered User

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    First, I agree completely about the "creating a valuable resource"; I've learned a lot from reading this forum.

    Leaving aside smaller cameras, large format is to some extent future proof. It's always a possibility to go back to coating your own plates, so loss of all film stock isn't necessarily a killer; the mechanical shutters we use may fail and not be repairable, but shutters came after photography and were only needed with faster materials. And even the cameras can be built to order by a craftsman in wood - designs are available on line.

    The big long term killer of digital I suspect isn't the electronics but the batteries. Rechargeable batteries can only be recharged a certain number of times, and virtually every camera takes a unique bespoke battery. Once the battery is no longer made, the camera is fit only for landfill or a museum case. The same applies to a certain extent even in the film world, in that the (mercury) battery that's native to a number of cameras (and my Lunasix light meters) has been discontinued. Happily, alternatives are available - and I've avoided cameras that rely on batteries to work at all.
     

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