LF Advice needed!

TomM

New Member
Registered User
Hi everyone,

I am looking to get a camera with quite specific specs - namely, one with as rigid a front element as possible. I work a lot with multiple exposures, specifically doing sort of animations where it’s essential that the camera doesn’t move between frames. Of course, a sturdy tripod helps a lot, but I’ve found that some LF cameras seem to have a lot less rigidity to them than others and can shift fractionally when re-cocking the lens. So, aside from fixing things with a liberal application of ferrous oxide, any particular brands or models that I should consider? Ideally quite portable; rail cameras seem to tend to have a bit of flex to then when I’ve used them before.
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
John Blakemore uses an MPP MicroTechnical MkVII and he does a lot of multiple exposure work. If you don't need front swing a MkIII or MkVI would be as good but don't have Graflok backs (except late MkVi's). I have 2 MKIII's and a MKVII and they'd definitely be ideal far better than my wooden Wista 45DX, it's had heavy use and while it was OK a few years ago I wouldn't like to do multiple exposures with it these days.

Ian
 

TomM

New Member
Registered User
Thanks Ian! I will look into them; swing backs are not entirely necessary for what I’m doing, am mostly after good quality negatives for large hand prints.
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
The MkIII and MkVI do have rear movement, just like Linhof Technikas.

1588165916382.png

This is a MkIII before I restored it essentially a good clean, I actually took it to bits then washed it (except the bellows), before I recovered it Maroon.

1588168021904.png

Rather a dull overcast day, this acme with most of a second MkIII completely in bits that's now dark blue and rebuilt as well :D

Ian
 

David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
A 5x4 enlarger with an adaptor for a darkslide might meet your needs. It might be listed as a copying device. If you can fit your lens into a self-cocking shutter, that might help, too.
 

Ian Grant

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Look up Rostrum camera.

But an MPP with a Protor Press shutter, the shutter is cocked as you trigger the cable release, as David mentions.

Ian
 
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