Hello!

Adrian Lambert

New Member
Registered User
Hi all.
I’m a middle age professional that spent the formative years behind large format Sinar cameras. I still own a Sinar f but my fave LF Camera is a modded Polaroid land camera, like the 185s that shoots 4x5 sheets - similar to the Chamonix Saber cameras. I’m currently building a neg digitisation station using a 240mm Fuji A lens whereby I’ll shift my DSLR adapted to the rear standard of the Sinar f to compile a set of captures that when stitched will cover the 4x5 neg. Early testing has given me a very satisfactory 1.5m digital file at print resolution. I’m looking for an affordable but strong copy stand to complete the set up. Also considering a LF darkroom.
I’m based in Glossop on the edge of the Peak District but feel more drawn to urban landscape than rural or wild landscape.
 

David M

Well-Known Member
Registered User
Welcome.
A very interesting setup. Is it possible to describe its advantages over using a scanner? If the advantage is that you enjoy constructing ingenious solutions to problems, that would be fine, but I do remain curious.
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
Welcome Adrian. I began by shooting rural industrial landscapes before shifting to urban industrial landscapes so can understand where you're coming from.

In my case it's not a complete shift as so projects take me back to the rural landscape, and even cityscapes although of the archaeological variety :D

I sometimes shoot in the Peak District but may last photographic visit was a few years ago and it's time I returned . . . . . . .

Ian
 

Adrian Lambert

New Member
Registered User
Welcome.
A very interesting setup. Is it possible to describe its advantages over using a scanner? If the advantage is that you enjoy constructing ingenious solutions to problems, that would be fine, but I do remain curious.
I am certainly guilty of persuing diminishing returns but that’s not that uncommon in photographers! I am able to resolve detail to the point of reaching the grain level using this method, whilst the resolution in a scanner setup of similar monetary value would be quite a bit less. And compared to the cost of drum scans or imacon scans I think in a short time I’ll be better off financially. But yes, I enjoy it!
 

Adrian Lambert

New Member
Registered User
Welcome Adrian. I began by shooting rural industrial landscapes before shifting to urban industrial landscapes so can understand where you're coming from.

In my case it's not a complete shift as so projects take me back to the rural landscape, and even cityscapes although of the archaeological variety :D

I sometimes shoot in the Peak District but may last photographic visit was a few years ago and it's time I returned . . . . . . .

Ian
Hi Ian
If you (like me) are the sort that likes company and conversation whilst out and about then feel free to let me know if you’re in the area as it sounds like we might have things we could talk about. It’d be interesting to find out more about your point of view. Glossop is in bit of a societal no mans land in some respects. Once a major player in the industrial revolution era, then a market town, and now a commuter base for Manchester and other towns with a struggling local economy. Very few of the 35k residents work in Glossop, and as such only experience limited aspects of the town. I’m a born and bred glossopian who lived away overseas for 15 years then returned under a little bit of duress and have been exploring the idea of what exactly it is that I’ve returned to through photography. It’s all a little bit disjointed still but I’m getting there.
 

Ian Grant

Active Member
Registered User
Hi Adrian

I don't think I've been to Glossop, I've not worked photographically much north of Millstone Edge in the Peak District. I'm always up to meet and talk with other photographers, it's interesting seeing different approaches.

Towns change dramatically, we've lost almost all the industry where I live. I had a 5 year project late 80's early 90's shooting in the Black Country resulting in Exhibitions, now with many industries gone it's time to go back.

We'll arrange to meet up sometime.

Ian
 

joe monteiro

Member
Registered User
Hi Adrian, and welcome.

Funny, listening (looking at) to this group of posts i see the same thing has happened over here. The old traditional industry is gone but i'm seeing a new manufacturing and research industry emerging to replace it perhaps there is some hope after all.
joe
 

JimW

Member
Registered User
The old traditional industry is gone but i'm seeing a new manufacturing and research industry emerging to replace it perhaps there is some hope after all.
It'll never be as big an industry again - so where it lacks in quantity, perhaps we could provide some quality.....:cool:
 
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